News

Good Morning, St Luke’s

When “circuit breaker” started and loved ones could no longer visit patients, we started “Good Morning, St Luke’s” to emotionally support patients and lift their spirits. This “radio programme” broadcast on the hospital’s public announcement system encouraged patients through inspirational messages by hospital staff and guests. We hope to also share these messages with you.

 

 

Koh Yock Kim suffered sudden weakness. She could not breathe, and had to be on a ventilator and feeding tube. After rehabilitation in St Luke’s Hospital, she could speak, eat without feeding tube and walk again. After her recovery, Yock Kim shared her story to let patients who were away from their families know “many people are there for them”.

 

 

When Crystal Goh woke up one morning, she suddenly could not speak. She was diagnosed with a rare neurological condition, Spasmodic Dysphonia. Through the years, Crystal has found hope and is also giving back through singing again.

 

 

When she was young, Asnah Binte Ibrahim’s father encouraged her to become a nurse. When she grew up, she started a different career. Eventually, she became a nurse as she yearned for a job that gave her satisfaction.

 

 

Being born to parents who are speech and hearing impaired, Cheung Siew Li never felt they were disabled by their disabilities. Learning to be their voices also motivated Siew Li to become a social worker, and be the voice of the weak and vulnerable.

 

 

Inspired by his own family physician, Dr Chia Tee Hien became a doctor as he also wanted to show the same care and empathy he received. Dr Chia feels that it is a privilege be patients’ confidante and to make a difference in their lives. Seeing his patients improve either physically or emotionally keeps him going.

 

 

Dr Amy Khor is thankful for the many opportunities she has been given through her role as a public servant to contribute in various capacities. She feels that pressure can be taken positively and has three ways to handle it: manage, prioritise and delegate. Whatever we do, we are not alone but we work in a team. During the COVID-19 period, Dr Khor is also heartened by the many Singaporeans who have shown tremendous courage and resilience.

 

 

Mr Murali Pillai started serving in Bukit Batok 20 years ago as a community volunteer under then MP the late Dr Ong Chit Chung. Through the opportunities to write petitions on behalf of residents, he saw many whose values were motivating and that exposure strengthened him in many ways. During circuit breaker, he has weekly e-meetings with volunteers and partners to leverage on their networks and reach out to those who need help in the community.

 

 

When Belinda Lee’s late mother fell ill, it was a very difficult time. Her heart broke every moment when she saw her mother in pain. Just the words “thank you” from her mother helped Belinda carry on taking care of her. She wants to give a word of encouragement to patients and caregivers, to be extremely patient and understanding towards one another. She hopes that everybody can have that extra ounce of kindness, love and appreciation for one another.

 

 

 

In 2008, Chew Chor Meng was diagnosed with a motor neuron condition called Kennedy’s disease and the doctor said that he only had 18-24 months to live. Upon receiving the news, Chor Meng was very shocked and fearful. At that time, he turned to God and prayed for God’s help. He outlived his prognosis and is thankful that his condition has not deteriorated, and is still able to do many things in life.

 

 

Veteran actor Zhu Houren has brought much joy and laughter through his onscreen roles. Offscreen, he also has a jovial personality. Once, Houren had to undergo a day surgery, however the surgery was prolonged due to complications. He was very worried, and also heard the worries of his family and friends. Houren decided to trust God and only listen to His voice. He was thankful that the surgery went well, and he was discharged after a few days and able to resume working shortly after.

 

 

 

Actress Aileen Tan is no stranger to the local audience. She started her acting career when she came in second in the inaugural Star Search competition. Through many roles in popular dramas and even movies like, “Long long time ago”, she has brought alive many memorable characters. Aileen hopes to encourage patients and staff, to support one another so that we can be stronger together to fight this pandemic.

 

 

 

Tan Chin Hock is an advocate of strong families. His story began 20 years ago when he found his mother talking to herself and having unstable moods. That pained him deeply, but he stood by her through thick and thin. The experience has also spurred him on to write many articles about the importance of family.

 

 

St Luke’s Hospital is grateful to interviewees and artistes for their participation and permission to share their recordings freely to a wider audience.